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Vincent D’Onofrio’s Least Favorite Thing About New York Is All the Republicans

Photo: Larry Busacca/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

Name: Vincent D’Onofrio
Age: 50
Neighborhood: [Ed: Unanswered for fear of stalkers. He had an incident.]
Occupation: Actor. He also directed the slasher musical Don’t Go in the Woods, which will be screened tonight at Joe’s Pub, followed by a live musical performance with the cast.
Who’s your favorite New Yorker, living or dead, real or fictional?
Radioman.
What’s the best meal you’ve eaten in New York?
A steak and pasta at Il Buco.
In one sentence, what do you actually do all day in your job?
Wait.
Would you live here on a $35,000 salary?
Yes, with rich people.
What’s the last thing you saw on Broadway?
American Idiot.
Do you give money to panhandlers?
Only if they are disabled.
What’s your drink?
Diet Coke.
How often do you prepare your own meals?
Never if I can help it.
What’s your favorite medication?
A sledgehammer.
What’s hanging above your sofa?
Citizen Kane.
How much is too much to spend on a haircut?
Haircuts should be free.
When’s bedtime?
When my eyes close.
Which do you prefer, the old Times Square or the new Times Square?
Old, minus the crime.
What do you think of Donald Trump?
Would he give me money to make my next film?
What do you hate most about living in New York?
Republicans.
Who is your mortal enemy?
Republicans.
When’s the last time you drove a car?
This morning.
How has the Wall Street crash affected you?
All the wrong people lost money and will never get it back, while those who caused it continue to get richer. It makes me want to use my favorite medication on them.
Times, Post, or Daily News?
All of them when I feel like sifting through bullshit.
Where do you go to be alone?
Inside.
What makes someone a New Yorker?
State of mind.

By: Vanita Salisbury

http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2010/05/vincent_donofrios_least_thing.html

Can I say I enjoyed this interview. What fun answers. ROTFL.- Frances


Thanks to Rosy of http://www.accidentalsexiness.com for posting.

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d onofrio 250x350 Law & Order: CI Ditching DOnofrio, Erbe, Bogosian

It’s shake-up time for “Law & Order: Criminal Intent.”

Sources from the “L&O” galaxy say that stars Vincent D’Onofrio, Kathryn Erbe, and Eric Bogosian are all expected to be phased out at various points during the series’ upcoming ninth season. Julianne Nicholson left the show a few months ago. Executive producer Dick Wolf is turning to Jeff Goldblum, who joined the cast last season, to remain as lead detective in the series along with Saffron Burrows, who was recently cast to replace Nicholson as Goldblum’s partner.

It’s a big change for a show that has weathered a lot of casting changes since it began in 2001. D’Onofrio and Erbe have been there since the beginning, while Bogosian joined in 2006. Since then, the original pair have had to make room for Nicholson and Chris Noth, who left last year. Goldblum arrived in 2008.

Details about D’Onofrio, Erbe and Bogosian’s exit are still unclear as the actors’ deals are being worked out. The network only recently renewed the Wolf Films/Universal Cable Prods. series for a ninth season, slated to premiere in late spring with a two-parter.

How interesting that Wolf has decided to go this way since D’Onofrio, while erratic, has been very popular. But “L&O:CI” is a USA Network show now after running on sister channel NBC. And USA, insiders point out, likes lighter fare when it comes to its shows. Goldblum is more in the tradition of Tony Shalhoub’s “Monk” than D’Onofrio.

While D’Onofrio is departing as a regular, it is possible for him to reprise his character in guest stints.

“Law & Order” just keeps chugging along in its various guises. The names change but the music remains the same.

————————————————————
D’Onofrio to leave ‘Criminal Intent’
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
September 26, 2009
http://www.capecodonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090926/LIFE/909260303/-1/rss10
LOS ANGELES — Changes are afoot at “Law & Order: Criminal Intent,” with charter cast member Vincent D’Onofrio exiting the USA Network series and recent recruit Jeff Goldblum taking over full time.

D’Onofrio’s character, Detective Robert Goren, will say goodbye in a two-hour handoff episode to open the ninth season early next year, “Criminal Intent” creator and executive producer Dick Wolf said yesterday.

Goldblum, who joined the series last season, will continue as Detective Zack Nichols in the NYPD Major Case Squad.

“After eight seasons, and with the addition of Jeff Goldblum, now is the perfect time for me to explore other acting opportunities,” D’Onofrio said in a statement.

He added, “I wouldn’t be surprised if Goren pops up from time to time.”

“Criminal Intent” premiered on NBC in 2001 with D’Onofrio as the series’ sole lead. From 2005 through Goldblum’s arrival, Chris Noth co-starred on an alternating basis with D’Onofrio.

USA became the series’ primary outlet two years ago.

In another possible cast change next season, Goldblum could be joined by Saffron Burrows, replacing Julianne Nicholson, according to a person close to the production who spoke on condition of anonymity. The person, who is not authorized to speak publicly about casting, said Nicholson isn’t expected to continue with the series. She has played Detective Megan Wheeler since 2006.

Burrows’ credits include the film “The Bank Job.”

=============================================================

OLD INTERVIEW

Law and Order Criminal Intent stars talk about the new season

Interview with Kathryn Erbe and Vincent D’Onfrio

USA sponsored a call with the stars of Criminal Intent- here is what they had to say about the new season:

Q: Kathryn, what about your role continues to challenge you?

K. Erbe
Finding ways to – let’s see. That’s a very good question. I don’t know, every day we have new challenges, just in dealing with the new actors that we get to work with. We have new writers on the show, new producers and I feel like it’s a challenge just staying involved with the work that we’re doing and staying actively involved in finding ways for Eames to stay important to the stories and to bring a positive – just have a positive effect on what we’re doing.

Q: And Vincent, after so many seasons, how do you all continue to maintain chemistry between each other?

V. D’Onofrio I think it’s been eight years now, so I think that anything the audience sees is just whatever has happened naturally in the eight years. I think that both of us kind of just rely on that – the history of the show and the history of the characters – to just somehow translate to the audience in some way.

Q: This is for either one of you: How much more in-depth is the Goren-Wallace frame-up story going to go into during season seven? Or is that just completely done?

K. Erbe Oh, she’s dead. Right?

V. D’Onofrio
Yes, that’s over.

K. Erbe Yes. Unfortunately, sadly, they killed her.
Q: There’s no way it’s going to come back to haunt you guys later on?

V. D’Onofrio
I don’t think so, no. That was a certain set of writers that were doing that, and we were enjoying that with them. And then we’ve had another set of writers since then, so – that’s not going to happen again, I don’t think.

K. Erbe Yes. It’s sad.

Q: This first question is for Vincent. You’ve played quite a variety of topics. What kind of role do you enjoy the most, or does like playing maybe evil have a different set of challenges than what you’re doing now?

V. D’Onofrio Is the question which I prefer?

Q: Yes, what kind of role; because you play good and evil, so –

V. D’Onofrio
I don’t know, I think I’m – it’s the same as most actors. Anything that’s interesting, you know. Like whatever comes my way, like the most interesting parts of those are the ones that I would do. I don’t really have like a dream role or anything like that. I just go script by script and see what’s interesting, and if not, then I don’t do it. You know, it’s like that.

Q: Vincent, I wanted to ask, with the events of last season’s finale, what is your character’s mental state at the beginning of the season? Is he resolved about – resigned himself to all of the loose ends being tied up or is he at all – has he broken down at all in the face of everything that’s happened to him and his nephew being missing?

V. D’Onofrio We never really tie anything up when it comes to Kate and my characters, because it’s – they always want to leave it open. You know, we tie up criminals, but – we’ll end those stories, but not – they’ll never really shut any kind of storyline down completely, so it’s kind of open as to what’s going to happen with my character, I don’t know. I think that this eighth season, I just – you know, I just played it differently than last season, but last season was very, very extreme. So this season, it’s like he’s just trying to be a cop, trying to do the best you can kind of a thing.

Q: My question here is for Vincent and I’d like to know, what is it like to be developing a character over several TV seasons as opposed to having to develop a character in a two-hour film?

V. D’Onofrio Yes, it’s completely different. When I first started the TV show, I kind of thought it’s ostensibly about the character, and did a lot of planning and stuff. Most of the planning went out the window, and then I just kind of tried my best after that. With a film, it’s much more – it’s really planned out scene by scene and there’s a real solid arc hopefully most of the time. The structure of the film is in three acts, you know it’s going to end – it’s easier to plan out a role like that. It’s just as interesting but it’s a completely different thing. With the show, it’s just wide open. We just keep doing it, and there’s different crimes, different little stories to tell. So it’s two different things. I think I just always will prefer films. I just think that’s my favorite thing to do. But Goren’s a great character, so it’s good to do.

Q: What do you feel it is about a show like Law & Order that resonates well with viewers?

V. D’Onofrio
I think in our show I think it’s the characters, and I think we investigate weird crimes and I think it’s a popular thing on TV, these kind of crime shows and – just like people were not – and still are – into like crime novels and short stories. That’s what we’re doing, but we’re doing like a TV version of that, so – you know, it takes off and people like it.

K. Clarke Do you have a favorite type of case to tackle on the show?

V. D’Onofrio Yes, I like simpler stories. Like we just finished one like a spree killer type story about one guy doing bad things, and Kate and I had to like, you know, catch him. It was more direct, not complicated, and it had heart, and I like that kind of thing.

Q: Jeff Goldblum is new to the show and I know you guys aren’t working directly with him, but have you seen any of his work and how is he fitting in with the show?

V. D’Onofrio To me it looks like he’s psyched. Kate, do you want to – go ahead.

K. Erbe That’s okay. We only really got to see him in the beginning when he was waiting for his scripts to be ready. He came and hung out with us extensively and learned all the names of everybody on the crew and just asked us a lot of questions. It seems like the crew is really happy with him and the producers and like he’s having a good time.

V. D’Onofrio Yes. He seems really enthusiastic. And I haven’t seen any of his episodes, so I can’t comment on that.

K. Erbe Yes.
Q: Have you worked with any particularly interesting guest stars or bad guys for the new season?

K. Erbe We have a lot. We have Lynn Redgrave, we have Scott Cohen and Kathy Baker are in the episode Sunday night. We had a great time with them. Who else, Vince?

V. D’Onofrio We’ve also worked with some really good unknown actors, like young people that were really good. We’re very lucky in that way, that most times we get really good actors, whether they’re known actors or not.

K. Erbe Yes.

V. D’Onofrio
That’s one of the pros of working on this show.

K. Erbe Yes.

Q: This question is for Vincent: Your character goes into some very dark places, and we’ve seen a lot of changes in him since the beginning in the last season, and I was wondering what kind of toll that takes on you as a person, what effect that has on you, if any, in your real life.

V. D’Onofrio Well, it takes a lot of time. It used to take a lot more time before we started sharing the episodes with another detective. But – you know, it’s – how do I answer this? The first four years, or maybe the first three years of the show, when we were trying to make the show a show, you know, just make it distinct from the other Law & Orders and just a plain old good show that people would watch, that was – that was hard. It was like a 24-hour job and it was with me all the time.

But that’s a long time ago now, and we all know how to do the show, and we know what the show is. And so it’s not that exhausting anymore. The hours are long sometimes, and when we are working we don’t see our families as much as we want. But that’s part of our job, so we have to do it. And as far as Goren, bringing Goren home, that just doesn’t happen anymore. I’ve been playing him too long, and it’s – it’s not something that stays with me.

Q: When you guys first took on these roles, did you go into it knowing full well that this might become like a lifelong fulltime job … Law & Order franchise –

V. D’Onofrio Lifelong, huh?

K. Erbe I don’t think either of us thought that we were going to be doing it for eight years.

V. D’Onofrio No way.

K. Erbe No. They never would have gotten you to agree to that.

V. D’Onofrio
No way. And the first – what did we do, we did 13 at first, Kate?

K. Erbe Right, yes.

V. D’Onofrio The first 13 was such a blur that I don’t think either of us was even thinking about – I don’t think it was – I don’t know, it wasn’t weighing heavy on me what was going to happen. Was it weighing heavy on you, Kate?

K. Erbe No. We had no idea. It was just getting through each day, really, trying to make it to the end.

V. D’Onofrio
The first 13 scripts were really, really good scripts and maybe there was like one clunker out of the 13, but they were really good scripts and very tough to figure out how to pull the show off while we were doing them. The last thing on my mind was like – it was just a blur. I wasn’t thinking about whether the show was going to run, honestly. That’s the honest truth. And I think we knew earlier than most people do with a – when you shoot 3, right? I think we knew pretty early that it was going to go.

K. Erbe Yes.
New Question- Vincent had to repeat it as Kathryn couldn’t hear it.

V. D’Onofrio
What do you like best about your character?

K. Erbe What do I like best about my character? What I like best about my character is she usually has the right thing to say. She knows what to say; she’s fairly straightforward and doesn’t seem to have difficulty making choices. Nothing like myself in real life. I rarely know the right thing to say and she seems to almost have infinite courage and she’s sort of like my fantasy of what it would be like to be like that – strong all the time and know what to do all the time and have a clear idea of what the right thing is to do and that sort of thing. So I like that about her. I like that she’s a strong woman in a tough job and a scary job. I think they’re both courageous. I think most of NYPD is very courageous. So that’s what I like about her.

Q I have one question for both of you regarding your roles outside of Criminal Intent. Out of all the work that you’ve done in movies, stage or whatever, what roles do you want to be remembered for, and which roles would you like to just kind of forget?

V. D’Onofrio A lot of them I’d like to forget.

Kathryn Erbe in Mighty Ducks 2

Kathryn Erbe in Mighty Ducks 2

K. Erbe The Mighty Ducks 2.

Q: Vincent, what about you?

V. D’Onofrio
Can I just say most of them?

K. Erbe You would not say that, you’re being sarcastic.

V. D’Onofrio
Rather than name them? Because I don’t want to like insult the filmmakers.

Q: No, that’s okay. That’s all right.

K. Erbe Yes, I even feel bad that I even said Mighty Ducks 2, because some people liked that movie.

Q: That’s okay, I’ll delete it from my memory banks. But Kathryn, I do have one more question for you: Goren is always touted as being this unstable genius and the brains of the partnership, and sometimes you’re there to be like the dry witness conscience. Are you okay with this role, or do you think Eames deserves more respect?

K. Erbe
Sometimes I get a lot to do, Eames has a lot to do, and sometimes she doesn’t. I’ve fought for the whole time for her to have more of an impact on the work that they’re doing, and it’s gone up and down. I like being the dry wit. I wish I actually did more of that these days. The humor has kind of gone out of the character and so I would like to find a way to bring that back.

Q: I think you guys need some more episodes like Vanishing Act.

K. Erbe Yes –

V. D’Onofrio Which one was that?

K. Erbe
Was that the magician one?

V. D’Onofrio
Oh, okay.

K. Erbe
Was that the magician one? I think it was. I can’t Google it because I’m on my phone.

Q This is for both of you: What got you started in acting in the first place?

V. D’Onofrio I was introduced to it by my dad at a very young age, because he was always involved in community theater and stuff. So I used to run lights and sound and stuff like that for plays and things. But I really didn’t think of acting until I guess I was like 18, and then – I don’t know, it just – I just thought I’d try it out. I don’t really know why. I think it was just in my life, really. I think it’s my dad’s fault. So I just thought I would give acting school in New York, in Manhattan, a try, so I did. And then I guess I just caught the bug and went for it.

Q: I just wanted to follow up on some of the stuff you guys have been saying. Vincent, Kathryn said that if you’d known it was going to be eight seasons, they probably wouldn’t have been able to lock you into the character. Why – I guess I have to ask – how have the managed to keep you two on and interested for so long, especially you, Vincent? You’ve certainly looked for a lot of variety in your film roles. Is it a love of the characters or is it a comfort zone or are they writing you the big checks, or is it a combination of all three?

V. D’Onofrio For me it’s a combination of all three.

K. Erbe Yes, for me too.

V. D’Onofrio I have a lot of freedom because of Law & Order. I have a lot of creative freedom. I have a lot of creative freedom on the show and I have a lot of creative freedom with my own time to do other films and do anything I want, so – it’s a very good situation.

K. Erbe Yes, and it gives us a structure for our lives. I mean, as actors, I never – I was ready to give up acting because I could not handle never knowing when I would have a paycheck or where the job would be, where it would take me; and having a daughter and now my son, I just couldn’t – it was just too hard of a life. And this gives us a – when we have time off, we know that it’s time off; it’s not time out of work, looking for other work.

And it’s really such an amazing experience to work with the same people for this length of time. It’s challenging and it’s so gratifying to know everybody’s families and – it’s just a very different experience from the sort of crash and burn of going from one job to another and really never knowing – this like gypsy lifestyle, never knowing where you’re going to be when. So it’s a very different, much more stable, if it’s even possible to say that – a stable environment.

Q: You were just mentioning creative freedom. I was wondering, I know it’s been a couple of years now, but has moving to cable and the USA Network sort of freed the show up to do different things that they couldn’t necessarily do in the – at NBC?

V. D’Onofrio I don’t think so. I think it’s exactly the same, right?

K. Erbe Yes. Because they show them on NBC too, so –

V. D’Onofrio I think the only change that I know, I think there’s like a minute – the episodes are like a minute longer or something like that, something silly like that.

Q: All right. And we have an older interview with Eric Bogosian. I’m a big fan of his.

V. D’Onofrio
Me, too.

Q: What’s he like to work with and is he going to be doing anything this season?

V. D’Onofrio He’s going to – yes, he’s doing lots.

K. Erbe
Yes. We just got him out in the woods last night in the rain.

V. D’Onofrio We located a girl in the woods with the captain last night.

K. Erbe Yes. He comes out a lot more this season than he ever has, I think. He was wondering really why he wanted to do that, when we were standing out in the middle of the woods in the rain.

Q: I have another question for both of you: What kind of advice would you give to new young actors coming up as far as what kind of education they should get and how they should pursue an acting career.

K. Erbe What would you say, Vin?

V. D’Onofrio I think when I was younger I would have said go to like a private acting school or something like that, but I think that these days, the drama departments and the universities are so great that I think that’s the way to go.

K. Erbe Get an education.

V. D’Onofrio Get an education. Go into the drama department, whatever, film department, or just like the arts section of a university and – start there, study there. And then after that, go to the city you want to live in, like L.A. or New York and then try to be – then try to get jobs. Do theater and stuff. But when I was younger I would have said just go straight to the city and take an acting class and try to get jobs. But I think these days – I’ve been checking out universities and stuff and I know some teachers and some teachers that teach writing, film writing, and I know some drama teachers and – they’re all really good teachers, so – I’m swaying towards that now.

Q: Your characters have a pretty complex and interesting relationship. After all they’ve been through, what would you like to see happen between them during this season?

K. Erbe I personally am very happy because this season we’re back on the same page. I, for some reason, really like that, when they’re on the same team and they’re just on the path together. Although it makes for probably a more interesting show when we’re at odds or going in different directions, I personally like that; and this season we were working together.

Q: Vincent?

V. D’Onofrio Yes, I agree with Kate, what she said. I think there’s nothing left to argue about, really. I think it depends on what the writers come up with. If they can come up with another good conflict between us, then most likely it will be cool to do. But I agree with what Kate said.

Q: We’re just curious to know if you had a favorite episode or onscreen moment from the coming season so far.

K. Erbe I would have to say that in the episode that is going to be on Sunday night, Kathy Baker and Scott Cohen, their characters, when they were in the interrogation room at the end when she kind of grabbed him and –

V. D’Onofrio
Oh, yes.

K. Erbe
— pressed him to her – to her chest and tried to comfort him after screaming at him, they were fantastic. It was very twisted and – I mean, we’ve had a lot, but that one really sticks out in my mind.

V. D’Onofrio Yes. He turned into this big baby right in front of her eyes. It was awesome.

K. Erbe Oh, such a baby. Yes.

V. D’Onofrio It was really good. So I guess it was somebody else’s screen moment that we liked most.

K. Erbe I guess. Can you think of one that was ours?

V. D’Onofrio No, I can’t. I think you’re exactly right, that was very entertaining.

K. Erbe It was very entertaining.

Both Kathryn and Vincent responded that they have no interest in directing or writing an episode of LNO- their work acting in this show is enough though Kathryn may be interested in directing something else.

Q: Do either of you have any new, I guess, acting projects coming up?

K. Erbe You have lots, right, Vin?

V. D’Onofrio
Lots?

K. Erbe You did like 17 films on the last hiatus – directed, starred.

V. D’Onofrio
That’s good, I’ll talk about that. I directed a film over the summer, a kind of new genre that I invented, slasher musical. I just finished it, and we’re taking it to L.A. in a week to sell to a distributor, so it’ll probably be out sometime, I hope, soon. I have a movie, The Narrows, coming out, and a movie called Staten Island coming out that I acted in – both of those. And that’s all.

K. Erbe And I have a movie with Edie Falco and Elias Koteas called Three Backyards.

Q: Vincent, I have a question about the very end of the last season, after Vincent or Goren realized that his nemesis had been killed and it was for his benefit – do you know what I’m talking about? – and he’s sitting with that professor. And you kind of looked at the end, when he said, “I did it to free you,” basically, and you got that look on your face like, you got it. And I was wondering if we’re going to be seeing now in this season a change in you or a kind of a freeing in your character because of this action.

V. D’Onofrio It’s nice that you saw it that way, because that’s the way I wanted you to see it, so it’s – yes. I wanted it to kind of be a freeing thing so that I could treat the next season fresh, so it could be a guy trying to keep his stuff together, do his job; and so what’s interesting about this kind of storytelling is that we always have that – like, the audiences that watch our show, if they’re fans of the show, then they know that that’s part of the learning. So even if we don’t mention it or I just show this kind of earnest cop trying to do his thing throughout the season, the season previous to that or other things in the previous years, they’re still present, because people are fans of the show and they know that that’s the guy they’re watching that went through all that stuff. So, yes, that’s what I did, and that’s what I’m doing now.

Q: How do you feel about the new writing team this season? Are you pleased with your episodes?

V. D’Onofrio It’s tough to – always tough when we switch writers to – it’s all – these last eight years have been just experience after experience, learning experience after learning experience, and it’s quite a business. To be a performer on a television show, you get a lot of curve balls thrown at you and you have to deal with them, and you know that the show has to be shot so you do your best to contribute and make it the best show you can. But you get thrown curve balls, like a new writing crew, and – who have never written for you and they’re trying their hardest to get it right, and they’re in a position where they have to get it right fairly quickly, because there are shows to shoot and to air, and so it’s tough. It takes a while.

But the great thing about is that they’re all talented people and everybody’s scripts are getting better and better, and what we’ve been talking about for the last few minutes is these great things about this season already. So there have been some amazing things already this season. But it’s tough. It’s tough to get new writers. And they’re great people and so we’re – this show is – this last show that we did was great, and it’s a good season so far, so we’re happy.

K. Erbe
Yes.

Q: The show seems to have completely dropped the law end of it, is that ever coming back? Or has it just kind of gone by the wayside?

K. Erbe We miss Courtney. ( Courtney B Vance- recently seen on ER) But we haven’t been in court at all this year, not once. I didn’t even think about that.

V. D’Onofrio No, it’s been just straight out catch the bad guy, political – we’ve been involved in politics of big corporations and stuff like that. It’s that kind of season. But we haven’t been – no, I think we do less of the law part, I think you’re right. I mean, as you know, it never really focused on that very much anyway, but – one of the cool things about having an ADA in the show is that you have to actually answer to somebody. Because there’s this kind of tension between the captain and the two detectives, but there’s a certain kind of tension between the detectives and the assistant district attorney and that’s fun to play. So we don’t get to do that often anymore.

K. Erbe
Yes.

J. Ruby I just want to ask Vincent, what’s the name of your slasher musical, so we can look out for it?

V. D’Onofrio
It’s called Don’t Go in the Woods.

Q Okay, that sounds interesting.

K. Erbe
It is. It’s very good.
April 2009

Source: ausiellofiles.ew.com
NBC is finally confirming what I first hinted at last week: Vincent D’Onofrio is exiting Law & Order: CI. He’ll say good-bye in the show’s two-part season 9 premiere, at which time he’ll pass the baton to co-star Jeff Goldblum.
Law & Order: Criminal Intent -USA NETWORK

Vincent and Kathryn to leave LO:Criminal Intent

Vincent D’OnofrioKathryn Erbe, Eric Bogosian also out

as Jeff Goldblum takes over.

By Elizabeth Guider and Roger Friedman

Sept 24, 2009, 11:00 PM ET

“Law & Order: Criminal Intent” is planning dramatic cast changes for next season, with four regulars, including star Vincent D’Onofrio, departing.

D’Onofrio is expected to exit sometime during the series’ upcoming ninth season, handing over his badge to Jeff Goldblum as the top detective on the major case squad.

Kathryn Erbe, who, like D’Onofrio, has been with the show since its beginning and plays his long-suffering partner Alex Eames, also will be phased out, as will Eric Bogosian, who plays the force’s captain, Danny Ross.

As previously reported, Julianne Nicholson, who played Goldblum’s partner but has just had a baby, her second, also is leaving. She’s being replaced by British actress Saffron Burrows.

Details about D’Onofrio, Erbe and Bogosian’s exit are still unclear as the actors’ deals are being worked out. The network only recently renewed the Wolf Films/Universal Cable Prods. series for a ninth season, slated to premiere in late spring with a two-parter.

Creator and executive producer Dick Wolf has long said that it is the stories, and not the actors, that form the core attraction of his “Law & Order” franchise.

Yet, like Sam Waterston on the original “L&O,” D’Onofrio has long been identified with “Criminal Intent” and has helped set its tone as Det. Robert Goren. His trademark gesture, the in-your-face tilt of his head when he interrogates criminals, is a highlight of each episode, as is his encyclopedic knowledge ofthe arcane that often helps in fingering the suspect.

But, after originating on NBC, “L&O:CI” migrated to sibling USA, which has put together a cluster of dramas that are lighter in tone and subject matter and have more quirkily upbeat characters, as in “Monk,” “Psych” and “Burn Notice.”

Goldblum, who brings an easy eccentricity to most of his work, is more in the tradition of Tony Shalhoub’s “Monk” than D’Onofrio’s brooding and tortured Goren.

Additionally, cost savings always factor in production equations these days, with long-standing actors on a show, like D’Onofrio and Erbe, pulling in substantially more than more recent additions.

The sweeping cast changes on “CI” resemble the 2003 shakeup on ABC’s “The Practice” when several key actors, including lead Dylan McDermott, Lara Flynn Boyle and Kelli Williams, were let go as a way to slash production costs.

The “CI” changes also represent the biggest shift so far for a show that has seen a number of faces come and go since it began in 2001. For several years, Chris Noth, who played detective Mike Logan, has alternated with D’Onofrio in the top role. He exited the Wolf fold at the end of the 2008 season and is now recurring on the CBS freshman series “The Good Wife.”

While D’Onofrio is departing as a regular, it is possible for him to reprise his character in guest stints.

Elizabeth Guider reported from Los Angeles; Roger Friedman reported from New York.

It is sad to see that Vincent and Kathryn will no longer be on Criminal Intent but I am looking forward to their continued presence in Movies. 

Cross fingers we may see Vincent go back to the stage, wouldn’t that be great if we were able to see him LIVE on stage.
MORE NEWS…

D’Onofrio, Erbe, Bogosian
By Roger Friedman
September 25, 2009

NEW YORK (Hollywood Reporter) – It’s shake-up time for “Law & Order: Criminal Intent.”

Sources from the “L&O” galaxy say that stars Vincent D’Onofrio, Kathryn Erbe and Eric Bogosian are expected to be phased out at various points during the series’ upcoming ninth season.

Julianne Nicholson already has departed because she is having a baby. Executive producer Dick Wolf is turning to Jeff Goldblum, who joined the cast last season, to remain as lead detective in the series, along with Saffron Burrows, who was recently cast to replace Nicholson as Goldblum’s partner.

It’s a big change for a show that has weathered a lot of casting shifts since it began in 2001. D’Onofrio and Erbe have been there since the beginning, and Bogosian joined in 2006. Since then, the original pair have had to make room for Nicholson and Chris Noth, who left last year. Goldblum arrived in 2008.

D’Onofrio has been popular in his role. But “L&O:CI” is a USA Network show, after running on sister channel NBC. And USA, insiders point out, prefers lighter fare. Compared with D’Onofrio, Goldblum is more in the tradition of Tony Shalhoub’s comic-dramatic “Monk.”

Details about D’Onofrio, Erbe and Bogosian’s exits are still unclear as the actors’ deals are being worked out. It’s possible that D’Onofrio will reprise his character inguest stints.

The network only recently renewed the series for a ninth season, slated to premiere in late spring with a two-part episode.

(Editing by SheriLinden at Reuters)

IMDB site for Vincent >Detective Robert Goren (131 episodes, 2001-2009)

New video showing Vincent D’Onofrio during the filming of ‘The ‘Irishman”
Paul Sorvino talks about his role in the movie.

A link that shows the gross earnings of all movies
Vincent D’Onofrio has appeared in.

Vincent D’onofrio talks about his role in The Irishman.

The Narrows
Vincent D'Onofrio And Kevin Zegers In The Narrows Showing In Sedona Arizona
“The Narrows,” a new feature film based on the novel “Heart of the Old Country” features a stellar ensemble cast including Emmy-nominee Vincent D’Onofrio and Kevin Zegers.
=====================================================

Law and Order: Criminal Intent
is a long running crime drama that explores the motivations behind crimes.Photobucket

Starring Vincent D’onofrio and Kathryn Erbe on USA Network.

Interviewed by Christine Nyholm- May 5, 2009 

Law and Order Criminal Intent has recently returned for their eighth season, airing on USA Network on cable television. Actors Vincent D’Onofrio and Katheryn Erbe recently took the time to take part in a conference call question and answer session, to which writer Christine Nyholm was invited. The two actors portray detectives in the New York Police Department Major Case Squad, in an intense drama that explores the psychological motivation behind the crimes.

Detective Bobby Goren (Vincent D’Onofrio) portrays the often strange and quirky genius detective, who can get inside the minds of criminals with his understanding of human nature and his own chaotic family upbringing. Detective Eames (Katheryn Erbe) portrays the senior officer and partner to Goren who understands and respects her sometimes difficult partner.

 Law and Order Criminal Intent, a spinoff of the long running Law and Order series created by Dick Wolf, alternates casts on a weekly basis. The detective partners on the alternate weeks in Jeff Goldblum and Julianne Nicholson.
 Goren and Eames
Detective Robert Goren went through some particularly dark storylines in season seven, including a stay in an abusive mental institution, the search for his nephew, the death of his derelict brother and a dramatic conclusion in which he was framed for the murder of his nemesis.
When asked what kind of effect the dark storylines have on him personally, D’Onofrio replied that it was hard for the first three of four years, when they were trying to make Criminal Intent distinct from the other Law and Order Shows, because it was like a 24 hour job. He went on to say that that was a long time ago and now the show is not so exhausting anymore. The hours can be long but that is part of the job. D’Onofrio stated that he just doesn’t bring Goren home anymore. The character no longer stays with the actor.

Read more here

Vincent D’Onofrio and Kathryn Erbe Live Q&A
– An Interesting Experience!
Playing Dead S8:1

While Law & Order: SVU and L&O: Original Recipe have been getting on my nerves lately by veering into ridiculous territory, Criminal Intent has always had one foot in the bizarre, thanks to the constant hulking presence of part-genius, part-madman Det. Robert Goren. In last season’s finale, Goren’s world crumbled around him, so I’m looking forward to seeing him pull himself together in the new season, especially now that he’ll be trading nights with Jeff Goldblum. (“Chris Noth… out!”) Vincent D’Onofrio and Kathryn Erbe, who plays Goren’s partner Eames, held a conference call to promote the new eighth season, and we got some quirky details out of them.

Vincent, after the events of last season’s finale, where we discover that Goren’s nemesis Nicole Wallace killed Goren’s brother, that Goren’s mentor Declan Gage has killed Wallace, that Goren’s dad was a serial killer and Goren’s nephew is missing… what is your character’s mental state at the beginning of the season? Has he been affected by all of this, or is he resigned to everything that’s happened?

Vincent D’Onofrio: I think that this eighth season, I played it differently than last season. Last season was very, very extreme, so this season, it’s like he’s just trying to be a cop, trying to do the best you can kind of a thing.

So will we be revisiting any of those storylines any time soon?

D’Onofrio: I don’t think so, no. That was a certain set of writers that were doing that, and we were enjoying that with them. And then we’ve had another set of writers since then, so — that’s not going to happen again, I don’t think.

Kathryn Erbe: Yes. It’s sad.

How do you feel about the new writing team this season?

D’Onofrio: It’s always tough when we switch writers. To be a performer on a television show, you do your best to contribute and make it the best show you can. But you get thrown curve balls, like a new writing crew, who have never written for you, and they’re trying their hardest to get it right, and they’re in a position where they have to get it right fairly quickly, because there are shows to shoot and to air, and it’s tough. It takes a while. But the great thing about it is that they’re all talented people, and everybody’s scripts are getting better and better, and there have been some amazing things already this season. This last show that we did was great, and it’s a good season so far, so we’re happy.

Kathryn, Goren is always touted as being this unstable genius and the brains of the partnership, and Eames is usually there to be the dry wit or the conscience. Are you okay with this role, or do you think Eames deserves more respect?

Erbe: Sometimes Eames has a lot to do, and sometimes she doesn’t. I’ve fought for the whole time for her to have more of an impact on the work that they’re doing, and it’s gone up and down. I like being the dry wit. I wish I actually did more of that these days. The humor has kind of gone out of the character, and so I would like to find a way to bring that back.

Is Eric Bogosian going to have a lot to do this season as your captain?

Erbe: Yes. We just got him out in the woods last night in the rain.

D’Onofrio: We located a girl in the woods with the captain last night.

Erbe: Yes. He comes out a lot more this season than he ever has, I think. He was wondering really why he wanted to do that, when we were standing out in the middle of the woods in the rain.

The show seems to have completely dropped the “Law” end of “Law & Order.” Is that ever coming back, or has it just kind of fallen by the wayside?

Erbe: We miss Courtney [B. Vance, who played Assistant District Attorney Ron Carver]. But we haven’t been in court at all this year, not once. I didn’t even think about that.

D’Onofrio: I mean, as you know, it never really focused on that very much anyway, but one of the cool things about having an ADA in the show is that you have to actually answer to somebody. Because there’s a tension between the captain and the two detectives, but there’s also a certain kind of tension between the detectives and the assistant district attorney, and that’s fun to play. So we don’t get to do that often anymore.

I know you guys aren’t working directly with Jeff Goldblum, but have you seen any of his work on the show, and how is he fitting in?

Erbe: We only really got to see him in the beginning, when he was waiting for his scripts to be ready. He came and hung out with us extensively and learned all the names of everybody on the crew and just asked us a lot of questions. It seems like the crew is really happy with him and the producers and like he’s having a good time.

D’Onofrio: To me it looks like he’s psyched.

Have you worked with any particularly interesting guest stars or bad guys for the new season?

Erbe: We have, a lot. We have Lynn Redgrave; we have Scott Cohen (Gilmore Girls) and Kathy Baker (Picket Fences) in the episode Sunday night. We had a great time with them. Who else, Vince?

D’Onofrio: We’ve also worked with some really good unknown actors, young people that were really good. We’re very lucky in that way, that most times we get really good actors, whether they’re known actors or not.

Do you have a favorite type of case to tackle on the show?

D’Onofrio: Yes, I like simpler stories. Like we just finished one spree-killer type story, about one guy doing bad things, and Kate and I had to catch him. It was more direct, not complicated, and it had heart, and I like that kind of thing.

When you guys first took on these roles, did you go into it knowing full well that this might become a long-term commitment?

Erbe: I don’t think either of us thought that we were going to be doing it for eight years.

D’Onofrio: No way.

Erbe: No. They never would have gotten you to agree to that.

D’Onofrio: No way. The first 13 [episodes] were such a blur that I don’t think either of us was even thinking about — I don’t know, it wasn’t weighing heavy on me what was going to happen. Was it weighing heavy on you, Kate?

Erbe: No. We had no idea. It was just getting through each day, really, trying to make it to the end.

D’Onofrio: The first 13 scripts were really, really good scripts — maybe there was like one clunker out of the 13, but they were really good scripts — and it was very tough to figure out how to pull the show off while we were doing them. It was just a blur. I wasn’t thinking about whether the show was going to run, honestly. That’s the honest truth. And I think we knew earlier than most people do that it was going to go.

How have they managed to keep you two on the show for so long — especially you, Vincent? You’ve certainly looked for a lot of variety in your film roles. Is it a love of the characters or is it a comfort zone or are they writing you the big checks, or is it a combination of all three?

D’Onofrio: For me it’s a combination of all three. I have a lot of freedom because of Law & Order. I have a lot of creative freedom on the show, and I have a lot of freedom with my own time to do other films and do anything I want, so — it’s a very good situation.

Erbe: Yes, and it gives us a structure for our lives. I mean, I was ready to give up acting because I couldn’t handle never knowing when I would have a paycheck or where the job would take me. And having a daughter and now my son, it was just too hard of a life. And now, when we have time off, we know that it’s time off; it’s not time out of work, looking for other work. And it’s really such an amazing experience to work with the same people for this length of time. It’s challenging and it’s so gratifying to know everybody’s families and — it’s just a very different experience from the sort of crash-and-burn of going from one job to another, this gypsy lifestyle, never knowing where you’re going to be when. So it’s a very different, much more stable environment, if it’s even possible to say that.

Do either of you have any non-Criminal Intent projects coming up?

Erbe: I have a movie with Edie Falco and Elias Koteas called Three Backyards. You have lots, right, Vin? You did like 17 films on the last hiatus — directed, starred…

D’Onofrio: I directed a film over the summer, a kind of new genre that I invented, slasher musical. It’s called Don’t Go in the Woods. I just finished it, and we’re taking it to L.A. in a week to sell to a distributor, so it’ll probably be out sometime, I hope, soon. I have a movie, The Narrows, coming out, and a movie called Staten Island coming out that I acted in — both of those. And that’s all.

Do either of you have any roles you’ve played that you’d like to forget?

Erbe: The Mighty Ducks 2.

D’Onofrio: A lot of them I’d like to forget. Can I just say most of them?

Erbe: You would not say that, you’re being sarcastic.

D’Onofrio: Rather than name them? Because I don’t want to insult the filmmakers.

Erbe: Yes, I even feel bad that I even said Mighty Ducks 2, because some people liked that movie.

Catch the new season of Law & Order: Criminal Intent Sunday night at 9 PM on USA, and talk about it in our CI forums! Then check back next week for our interview with Jeff Goldblum and Julianne Nicholson!

Season 3 of Law & Order: Criminal Intent
will be available to buy at Big W (Australia) on Wednesday 3rd June 2009

Detective Robert Goren Trivia

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http://www.podengo.com/apocrypha/characters/goren.html

Detective First Grade Robert Goren

 

Played by: Vincent D’Onofrio
Introduction Scene: CI Episode 1, “One” (9/30/01)
First Lines: “They live here?”

 

Work Information
Office Address:
Major Case Squad, One Police Plaza, 11th Floor. CI Episode 8, “The Pardoner’s Tale” (11/18/01)

Office Phone Number:
(212) 555-0146. CI Episode 16, “Phantom” (3/17/02)

Known Partners:
Detective Alexandra Eames (2001-Present)

Professional Idiosyncracies/Quirks:

  • Carries a brown zippered notebook, cell phone, cloth handkerchief, pocket knife.
  • Leaves Eames task of interviewing witnesses at fresh scene; examines physical evidence personally.
  • Can catch forensic evidence CSU techs miss.
  • Extremely detail-oriented; doesn’t miss a thing. Most of the time.
  • Not always totally accurate with his profiles. 

Career History

  • Served in U.S. Army, where he learned to speak and read German.  CI Episode 2, “Art” (10/7/01)
  • Prior to joining the Major Case Squad, worked as a detective in Narcotics for 4 years, running 3 sting operations that resulted in 27 major arrests, all of which resulted in convictions. CI Episode 13, “The Insider” (1/27/02)
  • Disinterested in Narcotics now; when Captain Deakins suggests Goren and Eames hand off a killing spree case to Precinct 15 to join the mayor’s drug task force, Goren recognizes that it’s a good chance to “get noticed,” but neither he nor Eames seem enthusiastic about the career opportunity. CI Episode 5, “Jones” (10/21/01)
  • Excluding hostage situations, between them Goren and Eames have handled nearly a dozen kidnappings and have not lost a single person. CI Episode 14, “Homo Homini Lupus” (3/03/02)

Medical/Psychological History

  • Shown smoking once, bumming a puff from a street person. CI Episode 4, “The Faithful” (10/17/01) but has said he quit smoking 7 years ago. CI Episode 30, “Pilgrim“(11/17/02)
  • Has experience dealing with the mentally ill (later on it is revealed his mother was schitzophrenic). CI Episode 4, “The Faithful” (10/17/01)
  • Takes an antacid after eating pastrami with mustard. CI, Episode 13, “The Insider” (1/27/02)
  • Has keen sense of smell.
  • Considering getting teeth fixed. CI Episode 5, “Jones” (10/21/01) (Episode in dispute; this may have come from CI Episode 16, “Phantom” – confirmation is pending) 
  • Has observed sodium amital used on Soviet defectors. CI Episode 30, “Pilgrim“(11/17/02)
  • Does not like confined or closed in spaces (i.e. small elevators.) CI Episode 41, “Cherry Red” (04/07/03); CI Episode 50, “Pravda” (10/26/03) 

Personal Information/History

Religion
Catholic (lapsed); former altar boy. CI Episode 4, “The Faithful” (10/17/01)

Other Aliases/Nicknames
“Bobby” (Detective Alex Eames and Captain James Deakins); “Goren” (Captain James Deakins); “‘Detective” (ADA Ronald Carver)

Childhood Events/Family Issues

  • Goren’s mother disliked most of his childhood girlfriends. CI Episode 3, “Smothered” (10/14/01)
  • Goren’s mother was a librarian before being hospitalized with schitzophrenia. CI Episode 30, “Pilgrim“(11/17/02) Symptoms of the disease began manifesting when Goren was 7, and he remains protective of her.
  • Father saw Johnny Unitas when he attended the 1958 championship game that went into sudden death overtime. CI Episode 41, “Cherry Red” (04/07/03)
  • Has a brother who is a gambling addict. CI Episode 95, “In the Wee Small Hours” (11/06/05)
  • His recently-deceased father left them when he was young. (Undocumented)

Friends

  • Lewis, an auto mechanic/body shop owner specializing in classic car restoration. CI Episode 8, “The Pardoner’s Tale” (11/18/01)
  • Has a friend named Max who is a rabbi. CI Episode 31, “Pilgrim“(12/01/02)
  • Has a friend named Stephen who is a linguist at Princeton. CI Episode 52, “A Murderer Among Us” (11/09/03)

Romantic Entanglements/Dates

  • Once dated Irene, a stockbroker, who is saving up to buy a house with (presumably new significant other) Carlos. CI Episode 10, “The Enemy Within” (12/9/01)
  • Read the Koran while stationed in Germany to impress a Turkish girl who lived near the base. CI Episode 30, “Pilgrim“(11/17/02)
  • Once dated a girl named Lola, who had cats. (Goren to Eames: “I had a girlfriend, Lola. She had cats….” Eames: “You ate furballs for her?” CI Episode 41, “Cherry Red” (04/07/03)

Education

  • Took a few psychology courses in college. CI Episode 9, “The Good Doctor” (11/25/01)
  • Learned to speak and read German while in the Army. CI Episode 2, “Art,”(10/07/01)
  • Read the Koran while stationed in Germany to impress a Turkish girl who lived near the base. CI Episode 30, “Pilgrim“(11/17/02)

Political Opinions/Affiliations:

  • Did not vote for current governor (Pataki, Republican). CI Episode 8, “The Pardoner’s Tale” (11/18/01)
  • Believes that idealy, children should have two parents. CI Episode 6, “The Extra Man” (10/28/01)
  • Pro-choice. CI Episode 11, “The Third Horseman” (1/6/02)

Interests/Hobbies/Tastes

  • Likes the art of Lucien Freud, preferring it to Impressionist works. CI Episode 2, “Art“(10/07/01)
  • Likes to dance. CI Episode 5, “Jones” (10/21/01)
  • Knows how to make bouillabaisse  (the French seafood-based stew). CI Episode 16, “Phantom” (3/17/02)
  • Reads “Smithsonian” magazine. To Eames: “It’s the perfect size for my treadmill.” CI Episode 30, “Pilgrim“(11/17/02)

Catch Phrases/Personal Quirks:

  • Refers to and addresses his partner, Detective Alexa Eames by her surname, but in serious moments has called her “Alex.”
  • Usually addresses ADA Ron Carver as “Counselor.”
  • Has referred to spiking over the counter drugs with cyanide [CI Episode 7, “Poison” (11/11/01)] and publication of names of doctors willing to perform abortions [CI Episode 11, “The Third Horseman” (1/6/02)] as “terrorism.”
  • Tends towards calling appealing automobiles “sweet.” CI Episode 8, “The Pardoner’s Tale” (11/18/01); CI Episode 12, “Crazy” (1/13/02)
  • Left-handed.
  • Size 13 shoe.